Butter

Making Butter

When making butter, you’ll get about half as much butter as the amount of cream used, plus residual “butter” milk produced by the process. Translated, that means 1 quart (32 ounces) cream yields 1 pound (16 ounces) butter plus 2 cups buttermilk; 1 cup cream yields 1/2 cup butter plus about 1/2 cup buttermilk.

Pour the cream into a bowl, set the electric mixer on medium speed, and blend. For best results, use organic cream with a butterfat content of at least 35 percent. Most organic creams and heavy whipping cream work well.

The cream transforms first into fluffy whipped cream and then stiff peaks. These break down into soft cottage-cheese-like curds as blobs of butterfat separate from the milk. After about 10 minutes, the butter begins to stiffen and clump together and the watery milk pools in the bottom of the bowl.

At this point, stop the mixer. Carefully pour off as much milk as possible and refrigerate it. Although this “buttermilk” is not like the thick, tangy buttermilk you’ll find in the market, it can be used for cooking, baking, and drinking.

Use a rubber or stiff metal spatula to press the butter and squeeze out as much of the liquid as possible. Add about 1/2 cup ice water to the butter and use the spatula to press the butter and water against the side of the bowl. This step, called washing, is important to keep the butter from spoiling. Pour off the cloudy liquid. Add more ice water and repeat the process two or three times until the water becomes less cloudy.

Continue kneading butter against the side of the bowl until all the liquid has been pressed out. Sprinkle with sea salt, if desired. Monique prefers not to salt the butter until she is ready to use it.

Pack the butter in containers, wrap tightly, and cover. Or try wrapping butter in parchment paper for a touch of elegance. As a bonus, the butter won’t stick to the parchment as it does to plastic wrap. For storing, first wrap in parchment, if desired, then wrap in plastic wrap or foil to make an airtight package.

Refrigerate up to 1 week or freeze for up to 6 months.

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