Pita has become my new favorite bread – this week.

I tend to go through stages with types of breads – artisans, sourdoughs, sandwich loaves, Italian rustic – just to name a few. It’s fun to make several loaves of something to get a good feel for the dough and what to expect. Once I get the basic down, I can play with different flours and the like.

It’s pita’s turn.

I took the recipe for the taboun I made a few days ago and tweaked the flours. it made for a bit more robust and flavorful bread.

Pita

  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 2 tsp yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups ’00’ flour
  • 1 cup bread flour
  • 1/2 cup sprouted wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup rye flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp olive oil

Combine the water, honey, and yeast. Let it stand for about 10 minutes until foamy.

Combine the flours and salt with the yeast and water mixture, and stir to form a soft dough.

Add the olive oil and knead for about 10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Form it into a ball and place it in a lightly oiled bowl. Cover the bowl and leave the dough to rise in a warm place for about 1 hour until it doubles in size.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Place a baking stone or baking sheet in the oven as it heats.

Knead the dough briefly and divide it into 8 balls. Place the balls on a lightly oiled baking sheet, cover, and let stand for about 15 minutes.

On a lightly floured surface, flatten each ball of dough and roll it into a circle 1/8-inch thick and about 7-8 inches in diameter.

Place on baking stone and bake until lightly browned and crisp, about 7 minutes.

They became the perfect base for grilled burgers.

Pita and Burgers

The pita went down, and then thick slices of tomatoes from the garden. On top of the tomatoes went fried hot peppers. next went the burger, and on top of the burger went lots of sauteed leeks. A runny fried egg finished it off.

A fried egg on anything is good, but when it’s on top of something like this – it’s downright excellent!

 

 

 

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