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San Francisco Sourdough

It’s 84° outside – that’s 29°C for the rest of the world – perfect weather for baking bread.

I really do like baking bread on hot days – proofing the dough outside in Mother Nature’s All-Natural Proofing Box makes for some great bread. And today’s loaf is some great bread.

Sometimes the stars all align and the bread gods smile down and everything just falls into place. This was one of those times.

As a kid growing up, I never paid attention to bread. It was just always good. The crusty end of any loaf was then – and is now – my favorite slice.

Back in the day, the two main bread makers in San Francisco were Parisian and Larraburu. My father drove a Larraburu Bread truck before joining the SFFD – hence my personal favorite as a child. Both were started during the Gold Rush and both had starters over 100 years old – and both tasted different from one another. I don’t remember Boudin Bakery at all – and it’s the only one left – and it’s not nearly as good as a loaf of Larraburu!

This recipe is one from my Mom and it’s an interesting mix – after the first rise, you mix in up to another cup of flour, shape the loaf, and proof, again. The dough did come out with that perfect bread dough consistency – soft, supple, and firm. It just felt right from the beginning!

I’ve made Mom’s other sourdough bread a lot over the years – this was my first on this one. It shan’t be my last! I’m not sure where this recipe originated but it makes a damned good loaf of bread.

I made one large flat round – a shape I don’t see much of anymore but was really popular in my youth. Crusty, crunchy, and chewy crust with a really nice crumb. I could easily see it as two long loaves, as well, but I use an old pizza stone for baking and, for me, it’s just easier to do a round.

This is going to make some really good toast tomorrow morning – and will go great with the cold fried chicken for dinner tomorrow night.

It’s nice to have options…

 

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